Skip to content

Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship

Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship

Apply NowContact Us
The Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship at Penn State Children’s Hospital is a three-year, ACGME-accredited program that admits two fellows per year.

Jump to topic

Search

Program Details

The Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship at Penn State Children’s Hospital provides physicians with unrivaled training in neonatology with a comprehensive, innovative educational curriculum, as well as an in-depth research experience individually tailored to each trainee’s area of interest.

The fellowship, ACGME-accredited since 1984, has a proud history of graduating successful neonatologists in both academic and private-practice settings. The academic curriculum provides training in clinical and basic science research methodology, quality improvement, educational methodology and multidisciplinary team leadership. Fellows receive protected learning time for didactic lectures, simulation and research.

As the only Level IV neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and referral center in central Pennsylvania, Penn State Children’s Hospital has a full complement of pediatric medical and surgical subspecialists. Specific therapies offered in the NICU include, but are not limited to:

  • High-frequency ventilation
  • Non-invasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist ventilation (NAVA)
  • Total-body cooling for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy
  • Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)

The neonatal program is consistently ranked one of the top neonatal programs in the country by U.S. News & World Report. With more than 600 admissions annually, including an active transport team and an obstetrical service with more than 2,200 deliveries per year, the patient population has a strong combination of patient acuity, diversity and complexity. The Perinatal Center attracts a diverse mix of complicated pregnancies, and the new, state-of-the-art 56-bed NICU is scheduled to open in November 2020.

The medium-sized academic program offers fellows a combination of a personalized fellowship experience with all that an academic medical center has to offer. The group includes approximately 30 neonatologists and advanced practice providers and a sizable clinical and support staff. Program faculty are nationally and internationally recognized in many areas of clinical, basic, translational and quality improvement research in many areas, including autonomic regulation, neonatal hypoglycemia, neonatal neurology, neonatal abstinence syndrome and pulmonary immunology.

Fellows in the training program develop a strong foundation of medical knowledge in neonatal physiology and pathophysiology and learn to provide evidence-based treatment strategies within a family-centered care model. Faculty and co-fellows support each fellow through their training with one-on-one mentoring and supervision, allowing for increased independence as skills progress. At the end of three years, the program’s goal is for fellows to have the knowledge and skills to provide top-notch and compassionate neonatal care.

Learn More about the Fellowship

Program Director’s Welcome Expand answer

Dear aspiring fellow,

Welcome! I invite you to explore this website to find out more about the Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship at Penn State Children’s Hospital. Please be sure to follow the links to our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), faculty and fellow pages, and the Hershey area.

Why choose Penn State? As a medium-sized program with access to a nationally-recognized quarternary care medical center and medical school, our fellows obtain experience managing a wide range of neonatal pathologies while receiving individual attention from faculty. Our size also allows us to tailor fellow training based on their interests, skills and career goals. Our Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship has a proud history of training successful academic and clinical neonatologists since 1984, and we were recently ranked one of the top Neonatology Hospitals in the country by U.S. News & World Report.

2020 has been a difficult year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but our faculty and fellows have risen to the challenge by finding innovative ways to continue to provide quality education and patient care. Meanwhile, construction has continued on our new home, a 56-bed, state-of-the-art Level IV NICU on the eighth floor of the Children’s Hospital with a target move-in date of November 2020. While this year the recruitment and interview process will be entirely virtual, we are excited to show you all that our program has to offer!

Please don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions. I look forward to meeting you.

Kristen M. Glass, MD
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Program Director, Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship
kglass1@pennstatehealth.psu.edu
717-531-8413

To Apply Expand answer

COVID-19 Update for the 2020 Interview Season

In accordance with national recommendations and in fairness to all fellowship candidates, many of whom are under travel restrictions, in-person visits and interviews will be suspended for the 2020 interview season. All fellowship interviews will be conducted virtually via conferencing software. Fellowship candidates are encouraged to pay close attention to ERAS and NRMP calendars for this season, which may be different than prior years, and adhere to all deadlines to ensure a successful match.

General Application Information

The Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship participates in the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) Pediatric Subspecialties Match, with typically two fellowship spots per year.

All application materials must be submitted through the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) for fellowship applicants. Applicants are encouraged to complete their applications as soon as possible once ERAS opens for the season.

All applicants must have completed a residency from an American Board of Pediatrics-approved training program.

Eligibility

Qualified candidates will be:

  • U.S. citizens, permanent residents or J-1 visa holders (no additional visa types are sponsored)
  • Board-eligible or board-certified in pediatrics
  • Eligible for a Pennsylvania medical training license

Required Supporting Documents

The following documents should be uploaded to ERAS for review:

  • ERAS application, including current photograph
  • Personal statement
  • Curriculum vitae
  • USMLE or COMLEX transcript
  • ECFMG certificate (if applicable)
  • Three letters of recommendation, including one from a neonatologist and one from the applicant’s current residency program director

International students

International medical graduates must hold a currently valid certificate from the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) to be considered for the match. The program accepts J-1 visas only.

Clinical Faculty Expand answer
Research Faculty Expand answer
Division Publications Expand answer

Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Publications

2020

  1. Amatya S, Corr TE, Gandhi CK, Glass KM, Kresch MJ, Mujsce DJ, Oji-Mmuo CN, Mola SJ, Murray YL, Palmer TW, Singh M, Fricchione A, Arnold J, Prentice D, Bridgeman CR, Smith BM, Gavigan PJ, Ericson JE, Miller JR, Pauli JM, Williams DC, McSherry GD, Legro RS, Iriana SM, Kaiser JR. Management of newborns exposed to mothers with confirmed or suspected COVID-19. J Perinatol. 2020; 40: 987–996.
  2. Brelsford GM, Nestler L, Doheny KK. Parents’ post-traumatic growth and spirituality post-neonatal intensive care unit discharge. J Psychol Theol. 2020 Mar 1(48): 34-43.
  3. Meister AL, Doheny KK, Travagli RA. Necrotizing enterocolitis: It’s not all in the gut. Exper Biol Med. 2020; 245: 85-95.
  4. Speer RR, Ezeanya UC, Beaudoin SJ, Glass KM, Oji-Mmuo CN. Term neonate presenting with the combined occurrence of mucolipidosis type II and Leigh syndrome. J Pediatr Genet. 2020 Jun; 9(2): 137-141.
  5. Thorenoor N, Kawasawa YI, Gandhi CK, Zhang X and Floros J. (2019) Differential Impact of co-expressed SP-A1/SP-A2 protein on AM miRNome; sex differences. Front. Immunol. 10:1960.
  6. Gandhi, C.K.; Patel, J.; Zhan, X. Trend of influenza vaccine Facebook posts in last 4 years: a content analysis. American Journal of Infection Control 1016/j.ajic.2020.01.010.
  7. Kresch MJ, Mehra K, Jack R, Greecher C. Sustaining improved nutritional support of very low birth weight infants. BMJ Open Quality 2020; 9:e000672.
  8. Phelps DS, Chinchilli VM, Weisz J, Shearer D, Zhang X, and Floros J. Using toponomics to characterize phenotypic diversity in alveolar macrophages from male mice treated with exogenous SP-A1. Biomark Res 8:5.
  9. Corr TE, Schaefer EW, Hollenbeak CS Leslie DL. One-year postpartum mental health outcomes of mothers of infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome. Matern Child Health J. 2020;24(3):283-290.
  10. Kresch MJ, Mehra K, Jack R, Greecher C. Sustaining improved nutritional support of very low birth weight infants, BMJ Open Quality, 9:e000672.

2019

  1. Schulze KV, Bhatt A, Azamian MS, Sundgren NC, Zapata G, Hernandez P, Fox K, Kaiser JR, Belmont JW, Hanchard NA. Aberrant DNA methylation as a diagnostic biomarker of diabetic embryopathy. Genet Med. 2019; 21(11):2453-2461.
  2. Elizondo LI, Rios DR, Vu EL, Kibler KK, Easley RB, Andropoulos DB, Acosta S, Rusin CG, Kaiser JR, Brady KM, Rhee CJ. Observed and calculated cerebral critical closing pressure are highly correlated in preterm infants. Pediatr Res 2019; 86(2): 242-246.
  3. Meister AL, Burkholder CR, Doheny KK, Travagli RA. Ghrelin ameliorates the phenotype of newborn rats induced with mild necrotizing enterocolitis. Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2019 Nov;31(11):e13682.
  4. Harris T, Gardner F, Podany A, Kelleher SL, Doheny KK. Increased early enteral zinc intake improves weight gain in hospitalized preterm infants. Acta Paediatr. 2019 Nov;108(11):1978-1984.
  5. Meister AL, Jiang Y, Doheny KK, Travagli RA. Correlation between the motility of the proximal antrum and the high frequency of heart rate variability in freely-moving rats. Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2019 Aug;31(8):e13633.
  6. Trivedi P, Glass K, Clark JB, Myers JL, Cilley RE, Ceneviva G, Wang S, Kunselman AR, Ündar A. Clinical outcomes of neonatal and pediatric extracorporeal life support: A seventeen-year, single institution experience. Artif Organs. 2019; 2019;00:1–7.
  7. Herrick HM, Glass KM, Johnston LC, Singh N, Shults J, Ades A, Nadkarni V, Nishisaki A, Foglia EE, for the NEAR4NEOS Investigators. Comparison of Neonatal Intubation Practice and Outcomes between the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Delivery Room. Neonatology. 2019;1–8.
  8. Umoren RA, Sawyer TL, Ades A, DeMeo S, Foglia EE, Glass K, Gray MM, Barry J, Johnston L, Jung P, Kim JH, Krick J, Moussa A, Mulvey C, Nadkarni V, Napolitano N, Quek BH, Singh N, Zenge JP, Shults J, Nishisaki A, National Emergency Airway Registry for Neonates (NEAR4NEOS) Investigators. Team Stress and Adverse Events during Neonatal Tracheal Intubations: A Report from NEAR4NEOS. Am J Perinatol. 2019.
  9. Singh M, Mehra K. Imperforate anus: Review. StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2019 Nov;3.
  10. Singh M, Gray CP. Neonatal sepsis. [Updated 2019 Jul 15]. StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2019 Nov;25-29.
  11. Weitkamp JH, Aschner JL, Carlo WA, Bancalari E, Perez JA, Navarrete CT, Schelonka RL, Walker MW, Porcelli P, O’Shea TM, Palmer C, Grossarth S, Lake DE, Fairchild KD. Meningitis, urinary tract, and bloodstream infections in very low birth weight infants enrolled in a heart rate characteristics monitoring trial. Pediatr Res 2019 Dec 4.
  12. Noutsios GT, Thorenoor N, Zhang X, Phelps DS, Umstead TM, Durrani F, Floros J. Major effect of oxidative stress on the male, but not female, SP-A1 type II cell miRNome. Front Immunol 2019;10:1514.
  13. Brelsford GM, Brelsford GM, Nestler L, Doheny KK. Parents’ post-traumatic growth and spirituality post-neonatal intensive care unit discharge. J Psychol Theol. 2019 June 21.
  14. Dizon MLV, Rao R, Hamrick SE, Zaniletti I, DiGeronimo R, Natarajan G, Kaiser JR, Flibotte J, Lee KS, Smith D, Yanowitz T, Mathur AM, Massaro AN. Practice variation in anti-epileptic drug use for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy among regional NICUs. BMC Pediatr 2019; 19(1):67.
  15. Elizondo LI, Rios DR, Vu EL, Kibler KK, Easley RB, Andropoulos DB, Acosta S, Rusin CG, Kaiser JR, Brady KM, Rhee CJ. Observed and calculated cerebral critical closing pressure are highly correlated in preterm infants. Pediatr Res 2019; 86(2): 242-246.
  16. Foglia EE, Ades A, Sawyer T, Glass KM, Singh N, Jung P, Quek BH, Johnston LC, Barry J, Zenge J, Moussa A, Kim JH, DeMeo SD, Napolitano N, Nadkarni V, Nishisaki A, NEAR4NEOS Investigators. Neonatal intubation practice and outcomes: An international registry study. Pediatrics 2019 Jan;143(1).
  17. Gandhi CK, Holmes R, Gewolb IH, Uhal BD. Degradation of lung protective angiotensin converting enzyme-2 by meconium in human alveolar epithelial cells: A potential pathogenic mechanism in meconium aspiration syndrome. Lung
  18. Harris T, Gardner F, Podany A, Kelleher SL, Doheny KK. Increased early enteral zinc intake improves weight gain in hospitalized preterm infants. Acta Paediatr. 2019 April 29.
  19. Kumar D, Vachharajani AJ, Wertheimer F, Vergales B, Glass K, Dannaway D, Winter L, Delaney H, Ganster A, Arnold J, Urban A, Johnston L, Bruno C, Gray MM, Sawyer T. Boot camps in neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship programs: A national survey. J Neonatal Perinatal Med 2019 Feb 23.
  20. Liu G, Kong L, Leslie DL, Corr TE. A longitudinal healthcare use profile of children with a history of neonatal abstinence syndrome. J Pediatr 2019 Jan;204:111-117.e1.
  21. Lucke AM, Shetty AN, Hagan JL, Walton A, Stafford TD, Chu ZD, Rhee C, Kaiser JR, Sanz Cortez M. Early proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy during and after therapeutic hypothermia in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Pediatr Radiol 2019; 49(7):941-950.
  22. Oji-Mmuo CN, Schaefer EW, Liao L, Kaiser JR, Sekhar DL. The possibility of early discharge for newborns being monitored for neonatal abstinence syndrome based on modified Finnegan score distributions. Clin Pediatr. 2019 Jun; 58(6):641-6.
  23. Oji-Mmuo CN, Speer RR, Gardner FC, Marvin MM, Hozella AC, Doheny KK. Prenatal opioid exposure heightens sympathetic arousal and facial expressions of pain/distress in term neonates at 24–48 hours post birth. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2019 Mar 1:1-181.
  24. Sawyer T, Foglia EE, Ades A, Moussa A, Napolitano N, Glass K, Johnston L, Jung P, Singh N, Quek BH, Barry J, Zenge J, DeMeo SD, Brei B, Krick J, Kim JH, Nadkarni V, Nishisaki A; National Emergency Airway Registry for Neonates (NEAR4NEOS) investigators. Incidence, impact and indicators of difficult intubations in the neonatal intensive care unit: a report from the National Emergency Airway Registry for Neonates. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 2019 Feb 22.
  25. Schulze KV, Bhatt A, Azamian MS, Sundgren NC, Zapata G, Hernandez P, Fox K, Kaiser JR, Belmont JW, Hanchard NA. Aberrant DNA methylation as a diagnostic biomarker of diabetic embryopathy. Genet Med 2019; 21(11):2453-2461.
  26. Shetty A, Lucke AM, Liu P, Cortes MS, Chu ZD, Hunter JV, Lu H, Lee W, Kaiser JR. Cerebral oxygen extraction and consumption during and after therapeutic hypothermia in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: A feasibility study using magnetic resonance imaging. Pediatr Radiol 2019;49(2):224-233.
  27. Ozawa Y, Ades A, Foglia E, DeMeo S, Barry J, Sawyer T, Singh N, Glass K, Jung P, Quek BH, Johnston L, Kim J, Napolitano N, Shults J, Vinay Nadkarni V, Nishisaki A. Premedication with neuromuscular blockade and sedation during neonatal intubation is associated with fewer adverse events. J Perinatol. 2019 Jun;39(6):848-856.

2018

  1. Basu SK, Ottolini K, Govindan V, Mashat S, Vezina G, Wang Y, Ridore M, Chang T, Kaiser JR, Massaro AN. Early glucose profile is associated with MRI brain injury pattern in hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. J Pediatr 2018;203:137-143.
  2. Coors SM, Cousin JJ, Hagan JL, Kaiser JR. Prophylactic dextrose gel does not prevent neonatal hypoglycemia: A quasi-experimental pilot study. Pediatr Res 2018;198:156-161.
  3. Corr TE, Schaefer EW, Paul IM. Growth during the first year in infants affected by neonatal abstinence syndrome. BMC Pediatr 2018 Nov 5;18(1):343.
  4. Jiang YF, Coleman HF, Doheny KK, Travagli RA. Stress adaptation updates oxytocin within hypothalam-vagal neurocircuits. Neuroscience 2018 Oct 15;390:198-205.
  5. Johnston L, Sawyer T, Nishisaki A, Whtifill T, Ades A, French H, Glass K, Dadiz R, Bruno C, Levit O, Gangadharan S, Scherzer D, Moussa A, Auerbach M; INSPIRE Research Network. Neonatal intubation competency assessment tool: Development and validation. Acad Pediatr 2018 Aug; S1876-2859(18)30473-X.
  6. Kaiser JR, Bai S, Rozance PJ. Response to the letter to the editor “the postnatal glucose concentration nadir is not abnormal and does not need to be treated”. Neonatology 2018; 114(2):164.
  7. Marvin MM, Gardner FC, Sarsfield KM, Travagli RA, Doheny KK. Frequency of skin-to-skin contact enhances vagal tone and reduces morbidities in hospitalized preterm neonates. Am J Perinatol 2018 Sep 7. doi: 10.1055/s-0038-1669946. [Epub ahead of print]
  8. Meister AL, Doheny KK, Travagli RA. A non-invasive novel method to assess necrotizing enterocolitis in rodents. Neurogastroenterol Motil 2018 Oct 8:e13484.

2017

  1. Amatya S, Macomber M, Bhutada A, Rastogi D, Rastogi S. Sudden versus gradual pressure wean from nasal CPAP in preterm infants: A randomized controlled trial. J Perinatol. 2017;37(6):662-667.
  2. Oji-Mmuo CN, Corr TE, Doheny KK. Addictive disorders in women: the impact of maternal substance use on the fetus and newborn. Neoreviews. 2017 Oct; 18(10):e576-e586.
  3. Passi R, Doheny KK, Gordin Y, Hanssen H. & Palmer C. Electrical grounding (EG) improves vagal tone in preterm infants, Neonatology. 2017;112(2); 187-192. doi: 10.1159/000475744. Epub 2017 Jun 10.
  4. Glass KM, Greecher CP, Doheny KK. Oropharyngeal administration of colostrum increases secretory immunoglobulin A levels during the first week of life in VLBW neonates. Am J Perinatology. 2017 Dec;34(14):1389-1395.
  5. Mammen MA, Busuito A, Moore GA, Quigley KM, Doheny KK. Physiological functioning moderates infants’ sensory sensitivity in higher conflict families, Dev Psychobiology. 2017 Jul;59(5):628-638.
  6. Meister AL, Gardner FC, Horchler SN, Hozella AC, Marvin MM, Travagli RA, Doheny KK. Vagal dysregulation in the first week of life is associated with markedly increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and late onset sepsis or necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm neonates. 2017; 155(2): S-87-88
  7. Adkins CA, Doheny KK. Exploring preterm mothers’ narratives: Meaning and influence revealed. Adv Nurs Sci. 2017 Apr/Jun; 40(2): 154-167.
  8. Stafford TD, Hagan JL, Sitler CG, Fernandes CF, Kaiser JR. Therapeutic hypothermia during neonatal transport: Active cooling helps reach the target. Ther Hypothermia Temp Manag 2017; 7(2):88-94.
  9. Basu SK, Salemi JL, Gunn AJ, Kaiser JR. Hyperglycaemia in infants with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy is associated with improved outcomes after therapeutic hypothermia: a post-hoc analysis of the CoolCap Study. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 2017; 102(4):F299-F306.
  10. Ni M, Kaiser JR, Moffett BS, Rhee CJ, Placencia J, Dinh KL, Rios DR. Use of vasopressin in neonatal intensive care unit patients with hypotension. J Pediatr Pharmacol Ther 2017; 22(6):430-435.
  11. Zhou Y, Bai S, Bornhorst JA, Elhassan NO, Kaiser JR. The effect of early feeding on initial glucose concentrations in term newborns. J Pediatr 2017; 181:112-115.
  12. Dillman NO, Messinger MM, Dinh KN, Placencia JL, Moffett BS, Cuevas Guaman M, Kayyal SY, Lee JC, Kaiser JR, Wilfong AA. Evaluation of the effects of extracorporeal life support on antiepileptic drug serum concentrations in pediatric patients. J Pediatr Pharmacol Ther 2017; 22(5): 352-357.
  13. Luton A, Hernandez J, Patterson C, Nielsen-Farrell J, Thompson A, Kaiser JR. Preventing pressure injuries for neonates undergoing therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy: An interprofessional quality improvement project. Adv Neonatal Care 2017; 17(4):237-244.
  14. Kresch MJ.  Management of the Third Stage of Labor: How Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping Can Affect Neonatal Outcome, American Journal of Perinatology, 34:1375-1381, 2017.
  15. Noutsios GT, Thorenoor N, Zhang X, Phelps DS, Umstead TM, Durrani F, Floros J. SP-A2 contributes to miRNA-mediated sex differences in response to oxidative stress: pro- inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant pathways are involved. Biol Sex Differ. 2017 Dec 4;8(1):37.
Current Fellows Expand answer
Fellow Spotlight: Rina Duke, MD Expand answer

About the fellow

A head-and-shoulders professional photo of Rina Duke

Rina Duke, MD

Name: Rina Duke, MD

Hometown: Allentown, Pa.

Clinical interests: Nutrition, ventilation, ELBW infant care, developmental care, medical education

Research interests: Neonatal hypoglycemia, improvement of the discharge process

Why did you choose neonatology?

“I have always been fascinated by how organ systems interact, and how systems may affect one another in sometimes surprising ways. What excites me about the NICU is not only the pathophysiology specific to neonates, but also how rapidly changes in pathophysiology are manifested as the patient grows and develops. As patients often are admitted for weeks to months, I also enjoy the ability to provide continuity of care over a prolonged period of time.”

Why did you choose Penn State for your fellowship training?

“I chose Penn State because it is a world-class organization and provided the opportunity to learn from a wide variety of cases with access to all subspecialties. It is a referral center and covers a large area in central Pennsylvania with its own transport team that fellows join. It was also obvious during the application and interview process that Penn State supports its residents and fellows well, and that the Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine division was a collegial and friendly environment.”

What are your thoughts on fellowship so far?

“NICU fellowship at Penn State is exactly what I imagined! The attendings and advanced practice providers get along with each other and create a supportive learning environment, with a nice balance of autonomy and supervision. There is a lot of support for both clinical training and research for fellows. There are multiple layers of evaluations, and leadership takes the fellows’ feedback into account to further improve the program. I would choose Penn State again!”

What do you enjoy doing outside of work? How is life in Hershey, Pa.?

“Fellows and advanced practice providers (and sometimes attendings too!) often meet up outside of work, trying out the local restaurants or going to Hersheypark. There are a lot of cool restaurants in nearby Harrisburg and Lancaster, along with craft breweries, vineyards and distilleries. I also enjoy outdoor activities and this area has a lot to offer, with many places for running, hiking, kayaking, swimming and skiing/snowboarding. Hershey is in an affordable area with easy access to several major cities (Philadelphia, New York, Baltimore and Washington, D.C.), so day or weekend trips are definitely possible.”

Fellow Spotlight: Lynnlee Depicolzuane, DO Expand answer

About the fellow

A head-and-shoulders professional photo of Lynnlee Depicolzuane

Lynnlee Depicolzuane, DO

Name: Lynnlee Depicolzuane, DO

Hometown: Medford, N.J.

Clinical interests: Delivery room management, late prematurity, ventilator management, resident and medical student education

Research interests: Surfactant proteins, management of hemodynamics in ELBW infants, human milk provision

Why did you choose Neonatology?

“Neonatology combined all of the aspects of medicine I most enjoyed as a medical student – the excitement of deliveries, the fast pace of critical care, keeping track of the details and continuity of care with patients and their families. I couldn’t imagine another specialty that fit my personality and interests more. The NICU is a special place and it is truly a privilege to be a part of this team.”

Why did you choose Penn State for your fellowship training?

“We are… Penn State! I’m a proud Penn State alumna and the university means a lot to me. When I interviewed here I felt as though everything I was looking for in a program could be fulfilled here. We have a diverse patient population with a large referral base, an excellent team of consultants, a great relationship with our advanced practice provider group, a strong group of attending neonatologists with a wide variety of interests, and many opportunities for education and teaching.”

What are your thoughts on fellowship so far?

“The fellow role has been an exciting and challenging one to step into. I bonded easily with the other fellows and have also formed relationships with other members of our advanced practice provider group, nursing, respiratory therapy, pharmacy and dietary teams who have really made this hospital feel like home. I feel well supported here in all aspects of my education and as a member of the team. I’m excited to see what the next years have in store.”

What do you enjoy doing outside of work? How is life in Hershey, Pa.?

“I enjoy exploring local restaurants searching for the best food and beverages; there is a surprising variety of both in this area! I also like to exercise and our hospital’s gym on campus is accessible, as well as affordable. We have several area theaters that showcase a wide variety of talent and there are many local music venues that host well-known artists. Hersheypark is a lot of fun, especially in the fall when the crowds die down! If you are into outdoor activities, there are many options locally and within a small radius. I lived in Baltimore during residency and I do not feel as though I am missing out living here to central Pennsylvania. It’s a short drive to visit friends and family in Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York. The beaches in New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland are close by and Harrisburg International Airport is only 10 minutes away for those longer journeys!”

Fellow Honors and Recognitions Expand answer

Fellow Presentations

Imtiaz Ahmed, MBBS

October 2019 – Transcriptome analysis reveals that all trans-retinoic acid prevents hyperoxia-induced suppression of EpCAM in A549 alveolar epithelial cells. 45th Northeastern Conference on Perinatal Research, Chatham, Massachusetts. Platform Presentation.

May 2019 – All trans-retinoic acid modifies the response of A549 alveolar cells to hyperoxia. American Thoracic Society International Conference, Dallas, Texas. Poster Presentation.

April 2019 – All trans-retinoic acid modifies the response of A549 alveolar cells to hyperoxia. Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting, Baltimore, Maryland. Poster Presentation.

March 2019 – All trans-retinoic acid modifies the response of A549 alveolar cells to hyperoxia. Eastern Society for Pediatric Research Meeting, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Poster Presentation.

March 2019 – All trans-retinoic acid modifies the response of A549 alveolar cells to hyperoxia. Pediatric Research Day, Penn State Children’s Hospital, Hershey, Pennsylvania. Platform Presentation.

Vivian Onuagu, MBBS

May 2020 – Autonomic Regulation Associated with Retinopathy of Prematurity Examinations. Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Accepted for Poster Presentation.

March 2020 – Autonomic regulation associated with retinopathy of prematurity examinations. Eastern Society for Pediatric Research Meeting, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Accepted for Platform presentation.

November 2019  – Cardiac vagal tone is a useful non-invasive measure associated with recovery following retinopathy of prematurity examinations. Ninety-fifth Perinatal Conference, Bonita Springs Florida. Platform presentation.

October 2019 – Measures of autonomic function are useful for assessing stress and recovery responses associated with retinopathy of prematurity examinations. Forty-fifth (45th) North-Eastern conference, Chatham MA. Platform presentation.

October 2019 – Skin Conductance is a Useful Measure of Sympathetic Activation Associated with Pain/Stress of Retinopathy of Prematurity Examinations in Premature Infants. American Academy of Pediatrics, National Conference Exhibition (AAP-NCE), New Orleans, Louisiana. Poster presentation.

Payal Trivedi, DO

May 2018 – Reducing Non-Infectious Central Line Complications in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting, Toronto, Canada. Poster Presentation.

May 2018 – Clinical Outcomes of Neonatal and Pediatric Extracorporeal Life Support (ECLS): A Seventeen-Year, Single Institution Experience. Penn State Children’s Hospital Pediatric Research Day, Hershey, Pennsylvania. Poster Presentation.

March 2018 – Clinical Outcomes of Neonatal and Pediatric Extracorporeal Life Support (ECLS): A Seventeen-Year, Single Institution Experience. Eastern Society for Pediatric Research. Platform Presentation.

October 2017 – Reducing Non-infectious Central Line Complications in Infants Requiring Central Venous and Arterial Catheters, Vermont Oxford Network Annual Quality Congress, Chicago, Illinois. Poster Presentation.

October 2017 – Prevention of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection in a Level IV NICU. Vermont Oxford Network Annual Quality Congress, Chicago, Illinois. Poster Presentation.

September 2016 – Building a Better Neonatal Extracorporeal Life Support Circuit: Comparison of Hemodynamic Performance and Gaseous Microemboli Handling in Different Pump and Oxygenator Technologies. 27th Annual ELSO Conference, San Diego, California. Poster Presentation.

May 2016 – Building a Better Neonatal Extracorporeal Life Support Circuit: Comparison of Hemodynamic Performance and Gaseous Microemboli Handling in Different Pump and Oxygenator Technologies. Penn State Children’s Hospital Pediatric Research Day, Hershey, Pennsylvania. Platform Presentation.

Tracey Harris, DO

June 2019 – Zinc: Why it’s Vital to the Preterm Infant. Penn State Children’s Hospital Pediatric Grand Rounds June 2019, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

May 2019 – Genetic variation in ZnT2 (R346Q) is associated with higher postnatal infection
rates in preterm infants during NICU hospitalization. Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting, Baltimore, Maryland. Platform Presentation.

March 2019 – Genetic variation in ZnT2 (R346Q) is associated with higher postnatal infection
rates in preterm infants during NICU hospitalization. Penn State Children’s Hospital Pediatric Research Day, Hershey, Pennsylvania. Platform Presentation.

October 2018 – Genetic variation in ZnT2 (R346Q) is associated with higher postnatal infection
rates in preterm infants during NICU hospitalization. AAP Northeastern Conference on Perinatal Research, Chatham, Massachusetts. Platform Presentation.

September 2018 – Thermoregulation of VLBW infants during air and ground transport. VON Annual Quality Conference, Chicago, Illinois. Poster Presentation.

May 2018 – Increased early enteral zinc intake improves weight gain and head growth
in hospitalized preterm neonates. Penn State Children’s Hospital Pediatric Research Day, Hershey, Pennsylvania. Poster Presentation.

March 2018 – Increased early enteral zinc intake improves weight gain and head growth in
hospitalized preterm neonates. Eastern Society for Pediatric Research, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Platform Presentation.

Past Fellows Expand answer

Testimonials from Graduates of Penn State Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship Program

Tracey Harris, DO
Einstein Hospital, Philadelphia, PA
Penn State NPM Fellow 2016-2019

As my June 2019 graduation approached, I was frequently asked if I was nervous to embark upon my new role as an attending neonatologist. The simple answer was no, because I was extremely well prepared by my fellowship training at Penn State. Not only is there an abundance of pathology in the NICU at Penn State, ranging from extreme prematurity to complex congenital conditions, but the faculty and staff are extremely invested in education. After practicing in a busy Level 3 NICU since leaving Hershey, I am even more thankful for my fellowship experience and would highly recommend the program at Penn State to anyone beginning their training in Neonatology.

Payal Trivedi, DO
Temple University Hospital/St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA
Penn State NPM Fellow 2015-2018

I have had the opportunity to work in both private practice and academic settings. The training I received at Penn State helped me to develop adaptability, which was critical in transitioning between these two work environments. As a fellow, I gained confidence leading a team in the delivery room and while on transports of critically ill infants. I am particularly grateful for the experience as an acting attending during my third year fellowship, which made the transition to being a new attending much less daunting. I have received positive feedback on multiple occasions from colleagues, mid-level staff, and nurses about my approach to providing updates or having difficult conversations with families. I would choose Penn State again over other programs because the fellowship training provided me with a very broad experience in neonatology, from extremely low birth weight infants to full term babies with rare anomalies. Everyone has a stake in education, from the faculty to the respiratory therapists and clinical pharmacists, making multidisciplinary family-centered rounds insightful and educational. During my training at Penn State I developed long-lasting relationships with people whom I can reach out to for advice even after fellowship.

Richard Jack, MD
Kapiolani Medical Center for Women & Children, Honolulu, HI
Penn State NPM Fellow 2014-2017

The Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center is a strong program with an excellent environment for learning. The attendings, NNPs and PAs are all a pleasure to work with. There is a nice balance of clinical and research exposure. As a referral center, the NICU sees a vast range of pathology and acuity which is excellent for training. The fellows are well respected and given appropriate autonomy for patient care. The nurses and respiratory therapists are knowledgeable and I learned a lot from them as well. I especially enjoyed my experiences with neonatal transport and ECMO. I would strongly recommend this program as I feel that it has prepared me well for attending life.

Jeffrey Meyers, MD
Golisano Children’s Hospital, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
Penn State NPM Fellow 2009-2012

I loved my experience at Penn State. There is a diverse exposure to complex pathophysiology from a large catchment area in PA. I benefitted from exposure to ECMO, complex congenital heart disease, and rare genetic disorders. The faculty provided excellent bedside teaching, and supported the development of independence and autonomy among the fellows. There was also a structured approach to supporting fellowship scholarly activities. Hershey, PA is a beautiful place to live and raise a family! I wouldn’t change a thing about my experience or where I trained.

About Penn State Health Expand answer

A screenshot shows the 2020 virtual tour of Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine.

Virtual Tour

A new-for-2020 virtual tour showcases locations across Penn State Health and Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, Pa.

Explore the virtual tour


Penn State Health

Penn State Health is a multi-hospital health system serving patients and communities across 29 counties of Pennsylvania. Its mission is to improve health through patient care, research, education and community outreach.

In December 2017, the system partnered with Highmark Health to facilitate creation of a value-based, community care network in the region. The shared goal of Highmark and Penn State Health is to ensure patients in the community are within:

  • 10 minutes of a Penn State Health primary care provider
  • 20 minutes of Penn State Health specialty care
  • 30 minutes of a Penn State Health acute care facility

Learn more about Penn State Health

Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Penn State College of Medicine campus is seen in an aerial photo on a sunny day.

Penn State Children’s Hospital (left), Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center (center) and Penn State Cancer Institute (right)

Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

500 University Dr., Hershey, Pa., 17033 (Derry Township, Dauphin County)

  • The health system’s 548-bed flagship teaching and research hospital
  • The only medical facility in Pennsylvania accredited as both an adult and a pediatric Level I (highest-level) trauma center
  • Dedicated surgical, neuroscience, cardiovascular, trauma and medical intensive care units
  • Accredited Life Lion critical-care transport providing more than 1,100 helicopter and approximately 750 ground ambulance transports per year
  • More than 1,300 faculty members and more than 650 residents and fellows
  • Approximately 28,500 admissions, 75,000 emergency department visits, 1.1 million outpatient visits and 32,000 surgical procedures annually
  • Designated as a Magnet hospital three times

Learn more about Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

Penn State Children’s Hospital

600 University Dr., Hershey, Pa. 17033 (Derry Township, Dauphin County)

  • A five-story, 263,000-square-foot-facility built in 2013
  • Three-floor expansion due to open in 2020
  • Level IV (highest-level) neonatal intensive care unit
  • Level I (highest-level) pediatric trauma center designation
  • Dedicated pediatric operating rooms
  • More than 150,000 pediatric outpatient visits and approximately 5,000 pediatric patient discharges annually

Learn more about Penn State Children’s Hospital

About Hershey: Benefits, Stipends and More Expand answer

An aerial image shows downtown Hershey with the words Welcome to Hershey superimposed at right.

Welcome to Hershey

A new-for-2020 guide to the Hershey, Pa., area showcases the highlights of life in central Pennsylvania.

Learn more about the Hershey area


More About Hershey

Interested in learning more about living and working in Hershey, Pa.? See details here:

Wellness Initiatives Expand answer

Wellness, including emotional, spiritual, social and physical health, is a crucial component to training and to becoming a professional, compassionate and resilient physician. Self-care is a skill which must be continually practiced and reinforced. Penn State College of Medicine and Penn State Health are committed to addressing wellness among residents and fellows, with multiple resources readily available.

Institutional resources

Graduate medical education resources

Department and Division Resources

The division recognizes the importance of maintaining a healthy work-life balance. Throughout the year, the division hosts celebrational gatherings, including an annual new fellow welcome picnic as well as a holiday party and fellow graduation picnic.

Four Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship trainees are seen sitting on a lawn during a wellness activity.

Wellness activity

Two people are seen standing in the rain, wearing race attire with numbers on their shirts.

Wellness activity

Two people are seen standing with a cake.

Graduation celebration

A group of approximately 10 people are seen gathered around a Christmas tree.

Holiday celebration

Contact Us Expand answer

Mailing Address

Penn State Children’s Hospital Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship Program
600 University Dr.
Hershey, PA 17033

General Contact Information

Phone: 717-531-5458

Email: jgebhart1@pennstatehealth.psu.edu

Curriculum Details

Training Overview Expand answer

The Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship is a three-year, ACGME-accredited training program. Fourteen months are dedicated to subspecialty clinical training, designed for the trainee to develop the necessary knowledge and skills for the practice of neonatology. These months include two required rotations in pediatric cardiology and maternal-fetal medicine. The curriculum is structured to give fellows more responsibility and independence as they gain experience and skill. During their third year, fellows on clinical service are placed in the role of acting attending with appropriate supervision from attending physicians.

Also, 19 months of the fellowship program are dedicated to clinical or basic science research training. The goal of research training is to provide fellows with a skill set to support career-long investigation and scholarly contribution to the field of neonatal-perinatal medicine.

Fellows in the program are trained in providing prenatal consultation during clinical rotations under faculty supervision. They also see patients in Neurodevelopmental Clinic throughout all three years of their training, where they learn to evaluate for developmental delays in the most at-risk patients.

Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine fellows supervise and teach medical students, residents and learners from allied health professions on clinical rotations. Throughout all three years of training, fellows are expected to prepare and present formal lecture topics and clinical cases at divisional conferences.

Rotation Overview Expand answer

The rotation schedule for each of the three years of fellowship is listed here. Schedules are customizable based on trainee interests, skills and goals. Fellows receive one month (four weeks) of vacation per year.

Year 1

  • Orientation to service in the NICU – one month
  • Service in the NICU – five months
  • Neurodevelopmental follow-up clinic sessions – six half-days
  • Research – five months
  • Vacation – one month (four weeks)
  • In-house calls – approximately 55

Year 2

  • Service in the NICU – four months
  • Maternal-fetal medicine – one month
  • Neurodevelopmental follow-up clinic sessions – six half-days
  • Research – six months
  • Vacation – one month (four weeks)
  • In-house calls – approximately 55

Year 3

  • NICU as acting attending (with supervision) – three months
  • Cardiology – one month
  • Neurodevelopmental follow-up clinic sessions – six half-days
  • Research – seven months
  • Vacation – one month (four weeks)
  • In-house calls – approximately 55

Summary over all three years of fellowship

  • NICU service – 12 months
  • Maternal-fetal medicine – one month
  • Cardiology – one month
  • High-risk neurodevelopmental follow-up clinic sessions – 18 half-days
  • Research – 19 months
  • Vacation – three months (12 weeks)
  • In-house night calls (approximately one night in six, averaged over three years) – approximately 160

Typical day in the life of an on-service fellow

  • 7 a.m. – Sign-out
  • 7:30 to 9 a.m. – Patient care
  • 9 a.m. – Team huddle, followed by family-centered multidisciplinary rounds
  • Noon – Conference
  • 1:15 p.m. – Radiology rounds with pediatric radiologist
  • 2-4 p.m. – Patient care, family meetings and resident education
  • 4 p.m. – Sign-out

The program’s size allows for flexibility for fellows to customize their training with additional experiences in the second and third years, including, but not limited to, an elective in palliative care medicine and medical education courses. Through partnership with Penn State College of Medicine, the program offers graduate certificates and advanced degree programs.

Electives Expand answer

Cardiology and maternal-fetal medicine (MFM) are two required rotations in the educational curriculum.

MFM is a one-month rotation completed in the second year of fellowship. During this rotation, fellows spend two weeks on the MFM inpatient service and outpatient clinic, where they are exposed to fetal testing and monitoring modalities. For the remainder of the month, fellows participate in outpatient prenatal consultations referred by the Perinatal Center and the obstetric service.

The cardiology rotation is a one-month experience during the third year of fellowship on the inpatient cardiology and cardiothoracic surgery service in the cardiac intensive care unit (physically part of the pediatric intensive care unit). During this rotation, fellows also follow patients with congenital heart disease in the NICU, observe cardiac surgeries and see patients in fetal cardiology clinic.

First-Year Fellow Boot Camp Expand answer
Three women are pictured standing in a line with their arms around each other

Boot Camp participants

Incoming first-year fellows in the program participate in the Regional First-Year Fellow Boot Camp at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

The course provides two days of didactics, simulation training, and networking with other new first-year fellows in neonatal-perinatal medicine from all over the Mid-Atlantic region. Registration, travel and meal costs are covered by the program and the sponsoring institution.

Didactic Series and Conferences Expand answer

Weekly or Every Other Week

Pediatric Grand Rounds (Tuesdays)

Starting Tuesday mornings at 7:30 a.m., Pediatric Grand Rounds covers core topics in pediatrics and pediatric subspecialties. Speakers include local and nationally-recognized faculty and researchers. Pediatric fellows also have the opportunity to speak at Grand Rounds during their third year of fellowship.

Journal Club (Wednesdays)

Twice monthly, the division meets from noon to 1 p.m. to discuss recent literature in order to inform best practice. Fellow and faculty discussants lead the critical appraisal of one to two recent articles per session.

Fellows’ Physiology Lecture Series (Wednesdays)

Every other Wednesday, fellows and faculty facilitators meet from 1 to 4 p.m. to discuss physiology topics relevant to the Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Board Examination. Each session concludes with a review of board-style questions. The curriculum is currently undergoing a transition from a traditional didactic model to a flipped-classroom model using content from the Organization of Neonatal-Training Program Directors (ONTPD) NeoFlip curriculum. Faculty from other specialties, including surgery, cardiology, pulmonology and maternal-fetal medicine, also present on relevant topics.

Morbidity and Mortality (Thursdays)

Morbidity and Mortality is a multidisciplinary team discussion aimed at improving patient care, held every Thursday at noon. Fellows are responsible for preparation and presentation of the case(s), including literature review, and discussion of systems improvements.

Perinatal Conference (Fridays)

Perinatal Conference is the multidisciplinary meeting between maternal-fetal medicine and neonatal-perinatal medicine groups to discuss recent and upcoming deliveries, held at 7:30 a.m. on Fridays. Faculty and fellows from both specialties discuss cases as well as physiology and management of high-risk pregnancies. Topics relevant to both sides of the mother-fetus dyad are discussed with the goal of improving understanding and communication between members of this special care team.

Division Meeting (every other Friday)

On alternate Fridays at 2 p.m., the faculty, advanced practice providers and fellows gather to discuss relevant topics in neonatology in order to inform best practice in the NICU.

Monthly

Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Scholarly Curriculum (second Wednesday)

The Scholarly Curriculum Series is held every second Wednesday of the month from noon to 1 p.m. and is a fellow conference facilitated by a core group of faculty on topics including: biostatistics and epidemiology with hands-on experience using statistical software, research methodology, quality improvement, medical and research ethics and education methodology.

A group of three people are seen with a dog.

Trainees in the Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship are seen with one of the Penn State Children’s Hospital visiting therapy dogs during a core curriculum event.

Fellows’ Core Curriculum Series (second Monday)

Fellows’ Core Curriculum is a set of structured didactic sessions held from 2 to 4 p.m. on the second Monday of the month addressing aspects of the ACGME’s core curriculum required for all pediatric subspecialty training, as well as some life-after-fellowship topics. This innovative learning program brings together fellows from across the Department of Pediatrics and provides instruction on topics such as research methodology and study design, grantsmanship, manuscript writing, financial advisement, work-life balance and physician wellness, CV preparation and negotiating employment contracts.

Perinatal Program Meeting (first Tuesday)

The multidisciplinary Perinatal Center meeting is held on the first Tuesday of the month from 4 to 5 p.m. to discuss upcoming deliveries of patients in the Perinatal Program. These patients include mothers carrying fetuses with congenital heart disease and other congenital malformations, as well as twin-twin transfusion. Facilitated by the maternal-fetal medicine perinatal coordinators, the meeting includes a brief review of each maternal/fetal case currently cared for within the Perinatal Program, with in-depth multidisciplinary commentary and discussion as appropriate. Postnatal case correlation is also included.

Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Research Conference (last Friday)

This conference is a divisional meeting typically held on the last Friday of the month at 2 p.m. to showcase both fellow and faculty research. The purpose of the conference is to provide updates on research projects going on within the division, to give feedback to the investigators to strengthen their projects as well as to provide inspiration and foster collaboration between researchers.

Virtual Learning Expand answer

The COVID-19 pandemic threatened to disrupt educational programming in 2020, but division faculty were innovative in their approach to learning and adapted didactic education and even ECMO simulations to virtual platforms.

Throughout spring 2020, the program continued to hold all of its regularly scheduled education described above, as wel as additional lectures offered through the Organization for Neonatal Training Program Directors and the Association for Pediatric Program Directors.

Offerings included Virtual Learning Cafés, as well as webinars and didactics on various neonatal physiology topics.

Virtual learning during the pandemic has been so successful that there are plans to add some of this education permanently into the program’s curriculum.

Simulation Expand answer

Fellows have opportunities throughout their training to participate in simulation-based education both in the NICU and in the nationally recognized and accredited Clinical Simulation Center.

Simulation is used regularly throughout the curriculum and is taught by faculty and staff trained in simulation education. Recurring simulations include procedural simulations such as exchange transfusion, thoracentesis and chest tube placement, quarterly ECMO simulations and monthly in-situ mock codes.

Fellows are encouraged to serve as facilitators for simulations held as part of medical student and pediatric resident education. These programs provide fellows with experience running simulation scenarios and facilitating educational debriefing sessions. Fellows are encouraged to obtain their certification as NRP instructors and to participate in NRP education for the NICU and obstetrical teams.

Additional training is available through the Teaching with Simulation instructor certificate course.

A group of people are seen in a simulated medical room.

ECMO simulation

Two people are seen standing over a dummy simulating a patient.

ECMO simulation

Research Expand answer

The fellowship curriculum provides fellows with a toolbox of skills and a solid knowledge base in research methodology, study design, grantsmanship, manuscript writing and statistical analysis.

The training program is structured with dedicated research time throughout the three years of the program, which allows fellows to develop a well-rounded, longitudinal research project. A faculty research mentor is identified based upon fellow interests and career goals. Research options include both clinical and basic science research, as well as educational research. Fellows will work with their mentor to develop a clinical question and review the relevant literature to develop a research protocol.

Fellows are encouraged to write IRB applications and apply for internal and external grants as applicable to their research project. Fellows then participate in data collection and statistical analysis with the goal of developing at least one peer-reviewed manuscript for publication.

The program highly encourages fellows to attend national, regional and local conferences to present their work and to interact with researchers and fellows from other institutions for inspiration, continuing education and initiating professional collaborations.

Mentoring Expand answer

Mentoring is an essential part of professional development during fellowship and beyond. The training program starts fellows off on the right path with an onboarding mentorship program developed by the fellowship director, Dr. Kristen Glass.

This program, now entering its third year, pairs an incoming fellow with a faculty member who meets regularly with the fellow throughout the first four months of fellowship to provide advice on adjusting to the fellow role, the medical center and life in Hershey. The onboarding mentor also helps the fellow explore interests and goals and orient the fellow to opportunities for involvement in committees, quality improvement teams and research.

At the end of the onboarding mentorship commitment (October of the first year of fellowship), the fellow selects an academic mentor from among the faculty. Academic mentors meet with fellows at least semi-annually to provide feedback on fellow evaluations and aid in the development of fellowship and career goals. Research mentors are also an important part of the fellow mentoring team. These mentors, selected based on fellow research interests and career goals, guide the fellow through a longitudinal research project along with the Scholarly Oversight Committee.

Fellow Honors and Recognitions

Exceptional Teachers Expand answer

Penn State College of Medicine and Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center accept ongoing nominations for the Exceptional Moments in Teaching award.

The award, given monthly by the Office for a Respectful Learning Environment, accepts nominations from College of Medicine students who are invited to submit narratives about faculty members, residents, fellows, nurses or any other educators who challenge them and provide an exceptional learning experience. See more about the award here.

Previous nominees from the Neonatal/Perinatal Medicine Fellowship are listed here. Click the + next to a nominee name to read their nominator’s comments.

Pediatric Research Day Presentations Expand answer

Pediatric Research Day is an every-other-year event that highlights the research of junior faculty and trainees at Penn State Health Children’s Hospital. This event also is an opportunity for researchers and caregivers at Penn State College of Medicine, other Penn State campuses and in the community to discover new applications for their work or to talk about potential areas for collaboration.

Finalists for the Clinical Young Investigator Award are selected from abstracts submitted by medical students, residents, fellows and junior faculty.

Previous presentations from the Neonatal/Perintal Medicine Fellowship are listed here, along with any honors or awards received.

Resident/Fellow Research Day Presentations Expand answer

The annual Resident/Fellow Research Day is held each summer on and around the Penn State Health Milton S. Medical Center campus in Hershey, PA.

The intent of the event is to provide an opportunity for residents and fellows to showcase their research accomplishments to their peers in other clinical departments, as well as their colleagues in the basic sciences.

Learn more about Resident/Fellow Research Day here.

Previous presentations from the Neonatal/Perintal Medicine Fellowship are listed here.

Other Awards Expand answer

Latest News from Penn State Children's Hospital

Penn State is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer, and is committed to providing employment opportunities to all qualified applicants without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, or protected veteran status.