Pathology Residency

Program Overview

The Pathology Residency at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center is a four-year, ACGME-approved program with a total complement of 16 residents.

Program Details

Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Penn State College of Medicine offers pathology residency training in combined Anatomic and Clinical Pathology (AP/CP), Anatomic Pathology (AP) alone or Clinical Pathology (CP) alone.

The Pathology Residency Program is an integral part of the Department of Pathology and plays an important role in the academic and clinical life of the medical center. During their training at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Penn State College of Medicine, residents build their knowledge and experience in the various disciplines of anatomic pathology, clinical pathology and experimental pathology. Our faculty members are strongly committed to the education of residents. They serve as instructors and mentors across the broad range of experiential and didactic educational activities offered by the department. Learning on rotations is supplemented by a core curriculum of didactic lectures spanning all sub-specialties of anatomic and clinical pathology as well as presentations on important topics by nationally well-known visiting professors. A rich and diverse array of departmental and interdisciplinary conferences allows residents to refine their diagnostic skills, gain exposure to rare and unusual cases, and contribute to patient evaluation and management. In addition, a Visiting Professors lecture series features nationally acclaimed faculty covering important concepts in pathology education, research and practice. Residents benefit not only from clinical pathology and anatomic pathology topics discussed and unknown slide reviews shared or lab management case studies, but meeting and networking with leaders in the field of pathology.

As a pathologist, you will have the opportunity to be a clinical specialist as well as a basic scientist. The skills and knowledge you acquire during your residency will prepare you to function as an expert in providing diagnostic and prognostic information. The discipline of pathology is a link to other basic medical sciences. For those interested in pursuing biomedical research there are opportunities to train with members of our Division of Experimental Pathology as well as with other faculty members involved in basic or clinical research. Our residency program is designed to prepare you for the ever-changing world of laboratory medicine. Educational opportunities in cytogenetics, molecular diagnostics, and laboratory management are all part of the residency experience.

A mentoring program allows each resident the opportunity to select a faculty member for one-on-one career guidance and professional development. Many of us were attracted to the field of pathology by the broad range of opportunities including clinical practice, medical education, research, and laboratory administration. Our faculty is trained and experienced in these diverse sub-specialties, and we stand ready to help you meet your goals.

The laboratory facilities at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center are exceptional. Our modern full-service laboratories are well-equipped and designed to meet the needs of our tertiary-care facility. Departmental and institutional libraries include a large selection of electronic journals and print journals and books. Resident offices provide an opportunity for sharing knowledge in a comfortable, private area with adequate space for each individual. In summary, we believe that our environment for pathology training is outstanding and one that will prepare our trainees well for the opportunities that their futures will offer them.

Our Team

Objectives

Pathologists’ activities encompass several broad categories:

  • Providing direct patient care by contributing to diagnostic and prognostic evaluation of a variety of samples.
  • Medical and scientific direction of clinical laboratories with responsibility for providing high quality laboratory data in a cost-effective and timely fashion.
  • Teaching students, residents, physicians, and paramedical personnel about pathologic evaluation of disease and the applications of laboratory medicine to patient care.
  • Developing new knowledge about the pathogenesis of disease and its classification and prognostic evaluation.

A career in pathology can be dedicated to one or more of these focuses, in an academic, private practice, or commercial laboratory setting. The objective of this residency in pathology is to provide opportunities for each resident to gain personal, participatory experience in the various skills needed to achieve success in their professional careers.

To that end, the program is designed to provide the following:

  • A setting that is conducive to self-study and learning-by-doing.
  • Training and personal experience in a variety of skills necessary to obtain diagnostic and prognostic information from patient samples.
  • Guidance in developing the skills of critical and analytic thinking necessary for proper interpretation of patient or research data.
  • Guidance in perfecting the skills of communicating information about disease, both oral and written.

To achieve these objectives, the resident and attending staff must work together with mutually understood expectations and commitments. In general, the resident is expected to do the following:

  • Enthusiastically perform the assigned clinical services.
  • Read extensively about the diseases encountered.
  • Acquire understanding and experience with the technical and mechanical aspects of the laboratory.
  • Develop the skills required to communicate information about pathology.
  • Gain experience in the skills required for problem solving and for interpretation of data.
  • Gain experience in laboratory management and quality improvement.
  • Assume a role in the education of colleagues.

Likewise, members of the faculty of the Department of Pathology are expected to do the following:

  • Help each resident define career and educational objectives.
  • Evaluate each resident’s progress, using subjective and objective means of evaluation, and communicate the results of those evaluations to each resident on a timely basis.
  • Delegate to each resident gradually increasing levels of responsibility, based on the resident’s experience and progress in the training program.
  • Communicate to residents their enthusiasm for their own area of research and provide opportunity for participation by interested residents.
  • Provide personal instruction to residents as appropriate for their subspecialty focus.
  • Participate on a regular basis in conferences that are intended primarily for the education of pathology residents.
  • Provide personal instruction in laboratory management and administration, and in use of computers in the laboratory.
  • Nurture an atmosphere of mutual respect and trust.
  • Encourage the development of residents’ participation in scholarly activities.
  • Encourage and provide opportunities for residents to gain competency, proficiency and to reach a level in which they are ready to enter independent practice.

The particular requirements for pathologists in practice will continue to change, so the content of the training program must keep pace with trends in the profession. In light of this, the department engages in an annual review of the residency program with a goal of optimizing the educational programming and resources. This review includes a discussion of recent national trends and consideration of future directions of growth for the program.

Recent initiatives include expansion of the elective offerings to include a private practice elective in anatomic pathology and an orthopedic pathology elective. A new clinical pathology consult rotation and a rotation in coagulation have been added. Cytogenetics training has been expanded. We believe that these changes have benefitted our residents and will help make them most competitive in their search for the ideal fellowship or job at the completion of their residency.

Our Divisions

Anatomic Pathology

The Division of Anatomic Pathology is composed of 25 faculty members with diverse subspecialty interests and educational backgrounds. However, all share a commitment to undergraduate and pathology resident education which is accomplished through a variety of educational methods.

Each week, the teaching calendar for the section includes an anatomic pathology unknown conference, dermatopathology conferences, and a gross pathology conference. Clinicopathologic correlation, the generation of a complete differential diagnosis, and the definition of the natural history and response to therapy are stressed. In addition, multiple interdisciplinary subspecialty conferences which correlate pathologic observations with radiologic and clinical data, and core curriculum lectures covering the full range of anatomic pathology subspecialties, complete the weekly calendar.

As residents gain experience, we encourage them to take on more responsibility in patient care and teaching roles. Semi-independent sign-out in Surgical Pathology is an extremely valuable privilege awarded to qualifying senior residents, which allows them to approximate the experience of a junior faculty member. Residents will also have the opportunity to serve as the presenting pathologist at interdisciplinary conferences throughout training, where they will provide information important for influencing patient care decisions.

Residents will also be invited to serve as instructors in medical student laboratory or problem-based learning sessions, provide formal lectures in our core curriculum, and present the results of their Quality Improvement projects at our departmental Grand Rounds.

The educational program is based largely on the clinical material seen at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. The case material includes approximately 42,000 surgical specimens, 15,000 cytology specimens and 90 autopsies. As a tertiary care center, we receive numerous challenging diagnostic specimens which reflect the patients treated here, including complex resections of advanced neoplasms, transplant pathology, iatrogenic immunosuppression, unusual infections, and pediatric diseases.

The Pathology Residency’s annual rotation schedule contains 13 four-week blocks.  The core anatomic pathology rotations include 16 blocks of surgical pathology, six blocks of autopsy and cytopathology, one block of autopsy and gross dissection, one block of autopsy and elective and pediatric study set, and one block of forensic pathology. Forensic pathology experience is provided at the Medical Examiner’s office in Dauphin and Lancaster counties. The surgical pathology, autopsy and cytopathology services encompass material from all organ-based subspecialties and pediatric and perinatal pathology. Electron microscopy, Molecular diagnostic testing, flow cytometry utilizing immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry testing is incorporated into these basic rotations as well as in elective rotations. There are five blocks of elective rotations available and can be in areas of Anatomic or Clinical Pathology. During the training period one “away” elective (two- to four-week block) can be arranged at an outside institution in an area of interest with approval from the Designated Institutional Official (DIO).

The Hershey Medical Center’s Cytopathology Laboratory has a total annual volume of approximately 15,000 cases. Approximately 50 percent of these are Pap smears, 29 percent are non-gyn, non-FNA specimens (fluids, CSF, brushings and washings), and 21 percent are fine needle aspiration specimens (FNAs). The Cytopathology Laboratory staff attend most radiographically-guided FNAs to provide immediate feedback on adequacy and a preliminary diagnosis when appropriate. Cytopathologists perform fine needle biopsies on a variety of superficial lesions. A typical four-week cytopathology rotation will include exposure to more than 50 FNAs from the lungs, thyroid, abdominal organs, bone, and other sites. A formal program including reading assignments, study sets, lectures, technical skills, and a post-test exists for the first three months, with a check-list to help the resident assure that all goals have been met. Training beyond the first three months allows residents to enrich their learning of uncommon and unusual processes by use of an extensive study set.

Residents on autopsy rotations perform autopsies under the guidance of an attending pathologist. Opportunities exist for senior residents to spend one or two months supervising less experienced residents. In addition to extensive reading, an integral part of each resident’s training is participation in several types of conferences, each emphasizing different aspects of autopsy pathology, e.g., autopsy case review conference, gross organ conference, medical mortality conference, neuropathology, and perinatal pathology conferences. Teaching second-year medical students is an important and valuable part of the rotation. Residents also observe and participate in forensic cases performed at the local coroner’s office. There also exists an opportunity to experience other facets of forensic pathology, e.g., scene investigation and legal testimony, during the four-week block rotation with the local medical examiner.

Experience in laboratory management and medical informatics forms another important component of education in anatomic pathology. The diagnostic reports of the Division of Anatomic Pathology have been computerized for over 25 years, and are accessible for retrieval and review. These reports are also integrated into the electronic medical record, which is also accessible for electronic review. We have incorporated education in anatomic pathology laboratory management in our core curriculum, as an experiential learning opportunity in quality improvement, through inclusion of residents in divisional quality assurance meetings, through participation in capital budget and departmental budget planning, and by involving residents in the preparation for, and sometimes service as an inspector in, College of American Pathologists laboratory inspections.

Clinical Pathology

The Division of Clinical Pathology is composed of 10 faculty members, who provide medical and scientific direction for the hospital’s clinical laboratories and specific core and research laboratories. The clinical laboratory performs more than 3.2 million billed tests each year, reflecting the diverse population of patients seen at this academic medical center.
The laboratory includes units for Blood Bank/Apheresis, Microbiology, Virology, Hematology, Chemistry, HLA/Immunology, Laboratory Information Systems, Phlebotomy/Specimen Collection and Specimen Processing.

As residents rotate through the various laboratory units, they receive instruction from the faculty and medical laboratory scientists in each section.

The Pathology Residency’s annual rotation schedule contains 13 four-week blocks. In the course of their training in clinical pathology, residents become familiar with the technical aspects and clinical applications of each laboratory procedure through active participation in bench work and frequent consultations with clinicians. The core clinical pathology rotations include four blocks of blood bank/apheresis, three blocks of microbiology, one block of virology, five blocks of hematology (two blocks of Clinical Pathology focusing on peripheral smear review, cell counting, and coagulation; two blocks of Anatomic Pathology focusing on lymph node and bone marrow slide review, flow cytometry, and molecular testing; and one block in the final year combining both clinical hematology and anatomic hematopathology service work), two blocks of chemistry, two weeks of HLA/immunology followed by two weeks of Blood Bank bench, and two weeks of cytogenetics training combined with an elective. There are also five blocks of Clinical Pathology Consult (CP consult) rotations in which the resident acts the front line Laboratory Director.  Residents on CP consult are exposed to laboratory management, specialized testing, molecular diagnostics training, and the pathologist as a consultant to clinicians regarding laboratory test utilization and interpretation.

Residents rotate through each unit and serve as laboratory physicians in all unit activities. During their rotations, residents are members of the unit management team and are actively involved in administration, planning and implementation of services, as well as solving operational problems. In addition, residents participate on numerous hospital committees, and are encouraged to attend and provide continuing education conferences. Opportunities to participate in research projects are available for those interested. There are five blocks of elective rotations. Residents can arrange electives in areas of Anatomic or Clinical Pathology. During the training period one “away” elective (two- to four-week block) can be arranged at an outside institution in an area of special interest. The away elective must be approved by the Designated Institutional Official (DIO).

Experimental Pathology

The Division of Experimental Pathology is dedicated to improving human health through basic and translational research that involves the study of disease or disease processes. We are a growing group, currently of seven faculty with PhD or MD/PhD degrees, occupying about 10,000 square feet of laboratory space. Four of our faculty members also fall under the umbrella of The Jake Gittlen Laboratories for Cancer Research, which is supported by local charity. Our areas of research include a range of topics, from molecular and genetic studies of esophageal, bladder and skin cancer, to the biochemical basis of mutation, genetic mechanisms of papillomavirus-induced cancer, polycystic ovary disease, zebrafish as a model for personalized medicine, the genetic basis of skin color, web-based infrastructures for science, and high-dimensional image informatics.

Our faculty collaborate with their colleagues in anatomic and clinical pathology and with other basic and clinical scientists. We participate in residency training by offering research opportunities and by contributing to curriculum and research conferences. We participate locally in medical and graduate education at Penn State University, and globally through collaborative research and scholarly activity.

Conference Schedule

A number of conferences are available to Pathology faculty and residents.

Daily Anatomic Pathology sign-out begins at 8 a.m. depending on subspecialty service.

Daily Clinical Pathology sign-out begins at 11 a.m.

Mondays

  • 8 to 9 a.m., first and third: Gyn Onc Tumor Board, Room C7702
  • MANDATORY: Noon to 1 p.m., weekly: Resident Core Curriculum Conference
  • 4 to 5 p.m., second: Peds GI Conference, Room C7702
  • 5 to 6 p.m., second: Adult Sarcoma Conference, Room T4007

Tuesdays

  • 7 to 8 a.m., first and third: Musculoskeletal Conference, Room C7702
  • 7:15 to 8:15 a.m., first and third: Neuromuscular Pathology Conference, Room C3621
  • 8 to 9 a.m., first: Neuromuscular Slide Review Staff Conference, Room C7602
  • 8 to 9 a.m., six times a year: Visiting Professor Lecture, including slide review with residents and noon or educational session; lunch provided
  • 8 to 9 a.m., third: Blood Bank Journal Club, Room HG119A
  • MANDATORY: Noon to 1 p.m., weekly: Surgical Pathology Conference, for all residents except those doing clinical pathology only
  • MANDATORY for residents on CP rotations: 2 to 3 p.m., fourth: CP Interesting Case Conference, Room HG023
  • 4 to 5 p.m., second: GI Tumor Board, Room T3007
  • 4 to 5 p.m., third: Renal Biopsy Conference, Room C7702
  • 5 to 6 p.m., last: Melanoma and Skin Tumor Board, Room T3007

Wednesdays

  • 7 to 8 a.m., first: Ophthalmology Pathology Conference, Room C7602
  • 8 to 9 a.m. weekly: Dermatopathology Conference, Room C7602
  • 11:30 a.m. to noon, first and third: Liver Transplant Conference, Room C7702
  • MANDATORY: Noon to 1 p.m.: Resident Core Curriculum Conference
  • Noon to 1 p.m., four times a year: Journal Club
  • Noon to 1 p.m., third: Autopsy conference, for all residents except those doing clinical pathology only
  • 2 to 3 p.m., first: Thyroid Conference, Room C7702
  • 3 to 4 p.m., third: CP QI Meeting, Room HG023
  • 4 to 5 p.m., fourth: GI Fellows Conference, Room C7702
  • 4 to 5 p.m., first, third and fourth: Head and Neck (ENT) Tumor Board, Room T4007
  • 4 to 5 p.m., third (quarterly): AP QA Meeting, Room C7702
  • 5 to 6 p.m.: Hematologic Malignancy Conference, Room T4007

Thursdays

  • 7 to 8 a.m., second and fourth: GU Tumor Board, Room C7702
  • 7:30 to 8:30 a.m., first: Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Conference, Room C7702
  • 7:45 to 8:45 a.m., weekly: Hematology/Oncology Grand Rounds, Room T2500
  • 8 to 9 a.m., first (September to May): Dermatology Grand Rounds, auditorium or lecture room
  • 11 a.m. to noon, weekly: Breast Tumor Conference, Room T4007
  • MANDATORY for residents on AP rotations: Noon to 1 p.m., first third and fifth: Gross Pathology, Room H7507
  • Noon to 1 p.m., second and fourth: Hematopathology Didactic, Room C7702 or C7602
  • Noon to 1 p.m., second: Frozen Section, Room C7602
  • MANDATORY: Noon to 1 p.m., fourth: Research and Quality Conference, Room C7702
  • MANDATORY for residents on CP rotations: Noon to 1 p.m., first and third: Benign Hematology, Room T2500
  • 1 to 2 p.m., third: Dermatology Patient Conference
  • 2 to 3 p.m., first: Pediatric L/L Conference, Room C6618

Fridays

  • 7 to 8 a.m., last: GI Tumor Board, Room C7702
  • 7 to 8 a.m., first, third and fifth: Neurosurgery Tumor Board, Room H4151
  • 7:30 to 8:30 a.m., second: Pulmonary Conference, Room C7702
  • 11 a.m. to noon, second and fourth: GYN Tumor Board, Room C7702
  • 11 a.m. to noon, first and third: NP Conference, Room H4151 on first Friday and Room C7702 on third
  • MANDATORY: Noon to 1 p.m., weekly: Core Curriculum Conference
  • Noon to 1 p.m., second and fourth: Renal Transplant Conference, Room C7602
  • Noon to 1 p.m., first: Resident lunch with department and program leadership, Room C7702
  • Noon to 1 p.m., fourth: Pathology Residency Program Review Committee, Room C7702
  • 1 to 2 p.m., first and third: Pediatric Tumor Board, Room T3007

Resident Accomplishments

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

  • Weyant GW, Newell JM, Benko FA, Donaldson KJ. A Methodologic Comparison of Invader and Autogenomics INFINITI in Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin Gene Mutation Testing. J Clin Diagn Res. 2:104, 2014.
  • Lam C, Weyant GW, Billingsley, EM. Longitudinal Melanonychia of the Toenail. JAMA Dermatol. 150(4):449-450, 2014.  (PMID:  24577153)
  • Dellenbaugh SG, Wilkinson L, Aydogan U.  Giant cell tumor of the distal phalanx of the great toe. A case report. Foot Ankle Spec. 7(3):237-41, 2014. (PMID:  24521755)
  • Lynch MC, Drabick JJ, Neves RI, Fox EJ, Mackley HB, Anderson BE. Palliative effect of capecitabine and cetuximab for refractory metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the perineum in epidermodysplasia verruciformis.  Skinmed. 12(1): 54-6, 2014.  (PMID: 24720087)
  • Lynch MC, Chung CG, Specht CS, Wilkinson M, Clarke LE.  Giant cell angiofibroma or localized periorbital lymphedema? J Cutan Pathol. 40(12):1059-62, 2013. (PMID:  24117715)
  • Lynch MC, Baker A, Drabick JJ, Williams N, Goldenberg D. Extraskeletal Ewing’s sarcoma arising in the larynx. Head Neck Pathol. 8(2):225-8, 2014. (PMID: 24072589)
  • Tam T, Harkins G, Caldwell T, Zaino R, Hazard D. Endometrial dye instillation: a novel approach to histopathologic evaluation of morcellated hysterectomy specimens. J Minim Invasive Gynecol. 20(5): 667-71, 2013.  (PMID:  23714746)
  • Tam T, Harkins G, Hazard D, Caldwell T, Zaino R.  Reply to Dr. Ozturk.  J Minim Invasive Gynecol. 21(1): 152-3, 2014.  (PMID:  24291208)
  • Baker AR, Ohanessian SE, Adil E, Crist HS, Goldenberg D, Mani H. Dedifferentiated eptithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma: analysis of a rare entity based on a case report and literature review. Int J Surg Pathol. 21(5): 514-9, 2013. (PMID: 23222809)
  • Rashidi A, Riley M, Goldin TA, Sayedian F, Bayerl MG, Aguilera NS, Vos JA, Goudar RK, Fisher SI. Delay in the administration of all-trans retinoic acid and its effects on early mortality in acute promyelocytic leukemia: Final results of a multicentric study in the United States. Leuk Res. June 2014, Epub ahead of print. (PMID:  25035073)
  • Olson J, Talekar M, Sachdev M, Castellani W, DelaCruz N, Davis J, Liao J, George M. Potassium changes associated with blood transfusion in pediatric patients. Am J Clin Pathol. 139(6):800-5, 2013. (PMID: 23690124)
  • Lynch MC, Wood L, Anderson BE, Clarke LE. An asymptomatic dermal plaque. Accepted in J Am Acad Derm.  In press.
  • Lynch MC, Graber EM, Johnson TS, Clarke LE. Epithelioid sarcoma resembling benign fibrous histiocytoma. Accepted in Cutis.  In press.
  • Weyant GW, Benko F, Wisotzkey J, Donaldson K. BRAF Mutation Testing in Solid Tumors: A Methodological Comparison, Accepted in J Mol Diag.

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles, Submitted

  • Weyant GW, Chung CG, Helm KF. Halo Nevus: Review of the Literature and Clinicopathologic Findings, submitted Int J Dermatol.
  • Weyant GW, Lee YH, Chung CG. Linear Papules in an Infant, submitted Ped Derm.
  • Voss SM, Riley MP, Lokhandwala PM, Gusani NJ, Yang Z. The Utility of Phosphohistone H3 immunostain in the Assessment of Mitotic Rate and Histologic Grade of Well-Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumors in Pancreas, submitted Am J Surg Path.

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles, In Preparation

  • Denlinger L, Lokhandwala PM, Abendroth CS. Phyllodes tumor of vulva – case report and review.
  • Lokhandwala PM, Davis JW, Shike H, Domen RE, Morrow C, Wang M, George MR. Establishing an Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-Compatible Platelet Donor Program.
  • Lokhandwala PM, Abendroth CS, Williams NC, Mani H, Walls M, Wang M and Zander, DS. Evaluation of TBSRTC for reporting thyroid cytopathology.

Published Abstracts

These abstracts were presented at national/international meetings as posters, unless otherwise indicated.

  • Lynch MC, Ioffreda MD. Tickbite alopecia with features of trichotillomania, J Cutaneous Pathol 2013.
  • Lynch MC, Bennett JA, Samson T, Clarke LE. Cutaneous myofibroma J Cutaneous Pathol 2013.
  • Lynch MC, Mucha S, Al-Mondhiry H, Clarke LE. A rare hit: massive rapid skin necrosis caused by low-molecular weight heparin injections, J Cutaneous Pathol 2013.
  • Lynch MC, Reiter GT, Drabick J, Specht C. Primary malignant melanoma of the leptomeninges with GNA11 (Q209L) mutation: Case report and literature review, J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 2014.
  • Wilkinson LA, Abendroth CS. Lymphocytic Thyroiditis Associated Atypia of Uncertain Significance.  J Am Soc Cytopathol 2013; 2(1S): S49.
  • Mikesell K, Davis J, Lokhandwala PM, Domen R, George M, Castellani, W.  Detection of Passive Anti-D Antibodies by Solid Phase Antibody Screening over time following Administration of Rh-IgG. Transfusion suppl. 2013.
  • Olson J, George M, Domen R. Whole Blood and Transfusion of Incompatible Plasma Containing Products. Transfusion suppl. 2013.
  • Jordan A, Ioffreda M, Sceppa J, Helm K. Trichoshavomania: The Importance of Clinical History in Alopecia, J Cutaneous Pathol 2013.
  • Jordan A, Ioffreda M, Helm K. Melanocytic Lesions Associated with Syringomas, J Cutaneous Pathol 2013.
  • Jordan A, Ioffreda M, Helm K. Perianal Poroma, J Cutaneous Pathol 2013.
  • Weyant G, Lam C, Billingsley EM, Helm KF, Clarke LE. Onychomatricoma Presenting as Longitudinal Melanonychia, J Cutaneous Pathol 2013.
  • Weyant G, Clarke LE, Wilkinson MJ, Baccon JW. Preauricular Nodules in a Newborn, Archives Pathol & Lab Med 2013.
  • Lokhandwala PM, Abendroth CS, Williams NC, Mani H, Walls M, Wang M and Zander DS. Assessment of Cytotechnologist-Cytopathologist Interpretative Agreement Using the Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology. Modern Pathol 2014.
  • Lokhandwala PM, Zander DS, Williams NC, Mani H, Walls M and Abendroth CS. Performance Testing Of The Bethesda System For Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology In Children. Modern Pathol 2014.
  • Riley MP, Voss SM, Lokhandwala PM, Yang Z. The Utility of Phosphohistone H3 Immunostain in Assessment of Mitotic Rate in GI Stromal Tumor of the Stomach. Modern Pathol 2014.
  • Smith-Chakmakova F, Navarro-Alvarez P, Yang Z. Frozen section evaluations of margins for pancreatectomy Modern Pathol 2014.
  • Voss SM, Riley MP, Lokhandwala PM, Gusani NJ, Yang Z. The Utility of Phosphohistone H3 immunostain in the Assessment of Mitotic Rate and Histologic Grade of Well-Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumors in Pancreas. Modern Pathol 2014.
  • Riley MP, Lokhandwala PM, Voss SM, Karamchandani D, and Yang Z. The Utility of Phosphohistone H3 immunostain in the Assessment of Mitotic Rate in Neuroendocrine Tumors of the mid-gut. Modern Pathol 2014.
  • Riley MP, Chetlen AL, Schetter S, Mack J, Hollenbeak CS, Han B, and Karamchandani D. Pathologic-radiologic correlation in evaluation of retroareolar margin in nipple sparing mastectomy Modern Pathol 2014.
  • Voss SM, Hollenbeak C, and Yang Z. The utility of routine HE stain and Ubiquitin immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of steatohepatitis. Modern Pathol 2014.
  • Voss SM, Yang Z, Zander DS, Bruggeman TR, and Karamchandani DM.  Identification of ROS1 rearrangement in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Modern Pathol 2014.
  • Yang X, Clawson G, Varlotto JM, Zander DS, Mani H and Rassaei N. Increased epithelial-to mesenchymal transition in non-small cell lunch cancers of diabetic patients. Modern Pathol 2014.
  • Yang X, Stairs D, Lehman H, Bruggeman RT and Nie X. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma model of 3D organotypic tissue culture system with genetic modification of epidermal growth factor receptor and p120-catenin. FASEB J 2014.
  • Kim J, Sasso M, Caldwell TR, and Craft DW.  Antimicrobial Stewardship and Therapeutic Outcomes of Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Detected by Conventional Culture Methods.  J Clin Micro C-1082, 2014.
  • Kessler M, Miller C, Myers D, Craft D. Assessment of Gram stain result and concordance with bacterial culture in respiratory secretions from a CF patient population.  J Clin Micro C-2031, 2014.

Workshop Abstracts

  • Riley M, Bayerl M. Case 116. Session:  AML with meylodysplasia-related changes.  Soc for Hematopathol/Eur Assoc for Hematopathol 2013 Workshop. Houston, TX, 10/2013. (accepted abstract)
  • Yang X, Bayerl MG, Pu J, Malysz J, Klapper J. AML with myelodysplasia-related changes. Soc for Hematopathol/Eur Assoc for Hematopathol 2013 Workshop, Houston, TX, 10/2013. (accepted abstract)

Poster Presentations

These abstracts were presented at local/regional meetings as posters, unless otherwise indicated.

  • Lokhandwala PM, Mikesell K, Shike H, Domen R, George M. Establishing an Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-Compatible Platelet Donor Program. PA Medical Society, Hershey, PA, 10/2013. (2nd place winner)
  • Mathur P, Chuang C, Lokhandwala PM, Whitener C. Uncovering the diagnosis: Fever of unknown origin in a seemingly immunocompetent patient. PA Medical Society, Hershey, PA, 10/2013.
  • Mikesell K, Davis J, Lokhandwala PM, Domen R, George M, Castellani, W.  A Comparison of Tube Testing and Solid Phase Antibody Screening Methods in Detecting Passive Anti-D Antibodies. PA Medical Society, Hershey, PA, 10/2013.  (First place winner)
  • Weyant G, Housman C, Weinstein J, Liang D, Specht C. Peters’ Anomaly with Multiple Congenital Malformations: Light & Electron Microscopic Study of a Case, Eye & Vision Res Day, Hershey, PA, 6/2014.

See published abstracts for presentations at: AABB, AANP, ASC, ASDP, ASM, CAP, FASEB, and USCAP .

Publications – Online and Book Chapters

  • Bent MA, Varacalla E, Fox EJ, Voss S, Frauenhoffer EE. Lipoma Arborescens and Coexisting Psoriatic Arthritis. JBJS Case Connector. 3(4): e121 1-5, 11/27/2013. (electronic journal article)

Invited Oral Presentations

International/National Presentations

  • Weyant GW, Fox EJ, Neves RI, Clarke LE. DF to AFH to MFH. Am Soc of Dermatopathol, Washington, D.C. 10/2013.  (oral platform presentation)

Regional Presentations

  • Lokhandwala PM.  “HLA-typing using Next Generation Sequencing,”  Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, Baltimore, MD, 11/2013
  • Newell JM . Adaptation and Implementation of a Multi-analyte Single Platform for Advanced Molecular Diagnostics. PA Association of Pathologists Meeting, Harrisburg, PA, 4/2014

Institutional Presentations

  • Kessler M. Autopsy findings case A13-44, Pediatric Intensive Care, Morbidity & Mortality Conf, 8/2013
  • Lokhandwala PM.  Infectious disease testing of blood products. Continued Education lecture for Virology technicians, Div of Clinical Pathology, 8/2013
  • Kessler M. Autopsy findings case A13-45, Neonatal Intensive care, Morbidity & Mortality Conf, 9/2013
  • Olson J, Ballard J, Al-Marrawi M, Creer MH. Hereditary Non-Spherocytic Hemolytic Anemia. Benign Hematology Conference, 9/15/2013
  • Caruso CR, Erdman PA. Dept. of Pediatrics. Penn State Children’s Hospital, Morbidity & Mortality Conf, 9/2013
  • Riley MP, Creer MH. Molecular Diagnostics in Hematologic Malignancies: A Methodological and Interpretive Review, Hematology/Oncology Grand Rounds, 10/3/2013
  • Mikesell KV. The Wonderful World of Plasma Derivatives. Benign Hematology Conference, 9/19/2013
  • Nie X, Creer MH. Mild Hemophilia A: The Challenge of Molecular Diagnostics for Individualizing Treatment. Benign Hematology Conference, 10/17/2013
  • Kessler M. Gray Platelet Syndrome, case presentation and discussion. Benign Hematology Interdisciplinary conference, 11/21/2013
  • Ohanessian SE, Creer MH. Laboratory Testing Algorithms for Evaluation of prolonged PT and aPTT. Benign Hematology Conference, 1/16/2014
  • Lokhandwala PM, Creer MH. Protein C Biology, Laboratory Measurement and case study of Protein C deficiency. Benign Hematology Conference, 2/20/2014
  • Lynch MC, Creer MH. Protein C and Protein S Anticoagulant: Part 2. Benign Hematology Conf, 3/20/2014
  • Weyant GW, Creer MH. Factor V Leiden: Lab Evaluation, Interaction with the PC/PS Anticoagulant System and Molecular Diagnostics of Thrombophilia. Benign Hematology Conference, 4/17/2014
  • Jordan A. Quality Assurance in Melanocytic Neoplasms. Natl Med Lab Prof Week CE session, Div of Anatomic Pathology, 4/2014
  • Newell J. Complete Pathological Examination of the Appendix for Improved Diagnostic Yield of Endometriosis. Natl Med Lab Prof Week CE session, Div of Anatomic Pathology, 4/2014
  • Lokhandwala PM. Establishing HLA-compatible Platelet Donor Program.  Natl Med Lab Prof Week CE session, Div of Clinical Pathology, 4/2014
  • Mikesell KV. Evaluating Differing Testing Methods for Identifying Rh-Immunoglobulin in Red Cell Antibody Screens. Natl Med Lab Prof Week CE session, Div of Clinical Pathology, 4/2014
  • Olson JE. Pneumatic Tube System Dashboard.  Natl Med Lab Prof Week CE session, Div of Clinical Pathology, 4/2014
  • Frampton WP, Shah TS. Dept. of Pediatrics. Penn State Children’s Hospital, Morbidity & Mortality Conf, 4/2014
  • Voss SM. CP-AP Correlation: Positive Fungal Cultures.  Natl Med Lab Prof Week CE session, Div of Clinical Pathology, 4/2014
  • Wilkinson LA.  Evaluation of Diff-Quik Utility in Select Frozen Sections.  Natl Med Lab Prof Week CE session, Div of Anatomic Pathology, 4/2014
  • Yang X. Intraoperative Evaluation of Signet Cell Carcinoma. Natl Med Lab Prof Week CE session, Div of Anatomic Pathology, 4/2014

Quality Improvement Lecture Series, Department of Pathology Grand Rounds

Residents

  • Trevor Caldwell, MD – Rapid Detection of Methicillin-resistant and Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Impact on Patient Outcome, 4/29/2014
  • Carla Caruso, MD – Blood Bank Basics for Internal Medicine Residents, 4/15/2014
  • Patrick Erdman, DO – Interactive Musculoskeletal Study Set, 4/22/14
  • William Frampton, DO – GI Study Set, 5/6/14
  • Meghan Kessler, DO – Forensics Curriculum, 4/29/14
  • Parvez Lokhandwala, MD, PhD – Establishing HLA-compatible Platelet Donor Program, 4/1/14
  • Michael C. Lynch, MD – T cell Receptor Gene Rearrangement Validation, 5/6/14
  • Jordan Newell, MD – Complete Pathological Examination of the Appendix for Improved Diagnostic Yield of Endometriosis, 4/15/14
  • Sarah Ohanessian, MD – Improvements in Laboratory Coagulation Studies, 5/6/14
  • Jordan Olson, MD – Pneumatic Tube System Dashboard, 4/22/14
  • Meghan Riley, MD – Development of an Automated Urine Screen with Reflex Culture, 4/29/14
  • Tanmay Shah, DO, Fetal Autopsy, 4/29/14
  • Sarah Voss, MD – CP-AP Correlation: Positive Fungal Cultures, 4/1/14
  • Grace Weyant MD – Update of B-raf Validation for Solid Tumor Typing, 5/6/14
  • Lee Wilkinson, MD – Evaluation of the Utility of Diff-Quick on Select Frozen Sections, 4/22/14
  • Xuebin Yang, MD, PhD – Intraoperative Evaluation of Signet Cell Carcinoma, 4/22/14

Fellows

  • Adrienne Jordan, MD – Quality Assurance in Melanocytic Neoplasms, 4/15/14
  • Kael Mikesell, DO – Evaluating Differing Testing Methods for Identifying Rh-Immunoglobulin in Red Cell Antibody Screens, 4/15/14
  • Cindy Nie, MD, PhD – Evaluation of the HevyLite Assay, 4/1/14
  • Faye Smith-Chakmakova, MD – Cardiovascular Study Set, 4/1/14

Editorial Boards

  • Newell J – Reviewer: ASCP Case Reports, Clinical Chemistry section

Professional Organization Roles and Committee Memberships

National

  • Newell JM – Resident Representative, American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP)
  • Olson JE – College of American Pathologists (CAP) Practice Management Committee
  • Ohanessian SE – Representative, CAP Resident Forum
  • Riley MP – Representative, CAP Resident Forum

College of American Pathologists Inspection Team Member

  • Newell JM – Inspector, College of American Pathologists-Laboratory Accreditation Program, Lancaster Gastroenterology Inc., Lancaster, PA
  • Voss SM – Inspector, College of American Pathologists-Laboratory Accreditation Program, Nason Hospital, Pittsburgh PA
  • Newell JM – Inspector, College of American Pathologists-Laboratory Accreditation Program, UT-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Institutional 2013-2014

  • Lokhandwala PM – Performance Improvement Committee
  • Ohanessian SE – Blood Utilization/Usage Committee
  • Olson JE – Communications at Transitions (CAT) Taskforce
  • Olson JE – Blood Utilization/Usage Committee
  • Olson JE – Blood Utilization Taskforce
  • Olson JE – Blood Utilization Project Oversight Committee
  • Olson JE – Bone Bank Oversight Committee
  • Olson JE – Resident Housestaff Quality Improvement Council
  • Voss SM – Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center Ethics Committee
  • Wilkinson LA – Graduate Medical Education Committee
  • Wilkinson LA – Surgical Case Review Committee
  • Yang X – Infection Control Committee

Departmental (Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine) 2013-2014

  • Caldwell TR – Visiting Professor Committee
  • Caruso CR – Anatomic Pathology (AP) Quality Improvement (QI) Committee
  • Erdman PA – Clinical Pathology (CP) QI Committee
  • Frampton WP – Awards Committee
  • Kessler MS – Gross Conference Liaison
  • Lynch MC – Medical Student Rotation Liaison
  • Newell JM – Pathology Residency Program Review Committee
  • Olson JE – Clinical Pathology (CP) Interesting Case Conference Liaison
  • Olson JE – CP QI Committee
  • Olson JE – Blood Bank Management Committee
  • Olson JE – Automated Testing Laboratory (ATL) Management Workgroup
  • Olson JE – Laboratory Utilization Committee
  • Olson JE – Pathology Residency Program Review Committee
  • Riley MP – Facilitator/Organizer, Surgical Pathology Unknown Conference
  • Shah TS – Librarian, Anatomic and Clinical Pathology Resident Room Libraries
  • Voss SM – Pathology Residency Program Review Committee
  • Voss SM – Awards Committee
  • Weyant GW – Facilitator, Resident Lunch with Program Leadership
  • Wilkinson LA – Tissue Review Committee
  • Wilkinson LA – Pathology Residency Program Review Committee

College of American Pathologist’s Laboratory Accreditation (CAP) Inspections – Internal

  • Caruso C – Inspector, Cytology, Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
  • Caldwell TR – Inspector, Microbiology
  • Erdman PA– Inspector, Histology and Neuropathology
  • Frampton W – Inspector, Clinical Chemistry
  • Jordan A – Inspector, Dermatopathology
  • Kessler M – Inspector, Mohs Laboratory
  • Lokhandwala PM – Inspector, Special Hematology
  • Lynch MC – Inspector, Special Chemistry
  • Mikesell KV – Inspector, Stem Cell Therapy Lab
  • Newell JM – Inspector, Molecular Diagnostics
  • Nie X – Inspector, Coagulation
  • Ohanessian SE – Inspector, Histocompatibility Laboratory
  • Olson JE – Inspector, Laboratory Information System (LIS)
  • Riley MP – Inspector, Hematology
  • Shah TS – Inspector, Virology
  • Smith-Chakmakova F – Inspector, Surgical Pathology Suite
  • Voss SM – Inspector, Decedent Care Services
  • Weyant G – Inspector, Clinical Laboratory Division of Clinical Pathology, SPA & Send-outs
  • Wilkinson LA – Inspector, General Laboratory & Phlebotomy, Div of Clinical Pathology
  • Yang X – Inspector, Blood Bank

Honors, Awards and Research Funding

Chief Residents

2014

  • Michael Lynch, MD, Co-Chief Resident
  • Meghan Riley, MD, Co-Chief Resident

2013

  • Jordan Newell, MD, Anatomic Pathology Chief
  • Jordan Olson, MD, Clinical Pathology Chief
  • Sarah Voss, MD, Chief of Resident Education
  • Lee Wilkinson, MD, Administrative Chief

Honors and Awards

  • Mikesell KV – PA Medical Society First Place Poster presentation award
  • Lokhandwala PM – PA Medical Society Second Place Poster presentation award
  • Lokhandwala P – Dr. Michael Bongiovanni Scholarship Award for professional development, Hershey, PA
  • Lokhandwala P – Resident Professionalism Award, Hershey, PA
  • Voss S – Resident Professionalism Award, Hershey, PA
  • Ohanessian S – Quality Improvement Presentation Award, Hershey, PA
  • Mikesell K – Quality Improvement Presentation Award, Hershey, PA
  • Voss S – Resident Research Award, Hershey, PA
  • Lynch M – Resident Exemplary Teaching Award, Hershey, PA

Research Funding and Travel Grants

  • Caruso CR, George, MR. Blood Bank basics for Internal Medicine residents, Pathology Research Grant
  • Craft, DW (PI), Caldwell TC. Rapid Detection of Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Impact on Patient Outcome, Pathology Research Grant
  • Lokhandwala PM and Yang Z. Immunohistochemical Study to Differentiate Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma from Metastatic Adenocarcinoma to the Liver, Pathology Research Grant
  • Mikesell KV, Davis J, George M, Domen RE, Castellani WJ. Comparison of Tube Testing, Solid Phase, and Gel Method Antibody screens for the Detection of RH-ImmunoGlobulin, Pathology Research Grant
  • Nie X, Bayerl MG, Malysz J, George MR. Investigating Apoptosis Pathway in Thymidine Phosphorylase Expressing Higher Grade B Cell Lymphoma, Pathology Research Grant
  • Helm KF (PI), Weyant GW, Chung CG. Characterization of Pseudomelanocyte Immunostating in Inflammatory and Neoplastic Skin Conditions, Pathology Research Grant
  • Yang X (PI), Rassaei N (PI), Mani H, Clawson GA, Shah T, Zander DS. Biologic Evaluation of Diabetes and Local Recurrence in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Pathology Research Grant
  • Jordan A – Travel Award, Am Soc Dermpathol, Washington, DC, 10/2013.
  • Lynch MC – Travel Award, Am Soc Dermpathol, Washington, DC, 10/2013.
  • Weyant GW – Travel Award, Am Soc Dermpathol, Washington, DC, 10/2013.
  • Wilkinson LA – Travel Award, Am Soc Cytopathology Mtg, 11/2013.
  • Newell JM – Travel Award, GYN Path short courses, 103rd Annual USCAP Mtg, San Diego, CA, 3/2014.
  • Mikesell KV – Travel Award, AABB annual meeting, Denver, CO, 10/2013.
  • Olson JM – Travel Award, AABB annual meeting, Denver, CO, 10/2013.
  • Lokhandwala P- Travel Award, 103rd Annual USCAP Meeting, San Diego, CA, 3/2014.
  • Riley MP – Travel Award, 103rd Annual USCAP Meeting, San Diego, CA, 3/2014.
  • Smith-Chakmakova F – Travel Award, 103rd Annual USCAP Meeting, San Diego, 3/2014.
  • Voss SM – Travel Award, 103rd Annual USCAP Meeting, San Diego, CA, 3/2014.
  • Yang X – Travel Award, 103rd Annual USCAP Meeting, San Diego, CA, 3/2014.
  • Yang X – Travel Award, FASEB (Fed of Am Soc for Expmtl Biol) Meeting, San Diego, CA, 4/2014.
  • Caldwell TR – Travel Award, Am Soc Microbiology, Boston, MA, 5/2014.
  • Lynch M – Travel Award, ACGME Leadership Skills for Chief Residents Meeting, Denver, CO, 5/ 2014.
  • Riley M – Travel Award, ACGME Leadership Skills for Chief Residents Meeting, Denver, CO, 5/ 2014.
  • Lynch MC – Travel Award, Am Assoc Neuropathol, Portland, OR, 6/2014.

Teaching and Educational Initiatives

Medical Student Teaching Activities, Penn State College of Medicine

  • Caldwell T – Pathology Lab Facilitator, Cardiovascular Gross Lab, Fall 2013
  • Caruso C – Mentor/Instructor: Senior Medical Student Elective – surgical pathology, cytopathology, and autopsy pathology, 3rd/4th year
  • Caruso C – Laboratory instructor: Cardiovascular Pathology Laboratory (CAR 722) for 2nd year medical students – 4 contact hours Responsibilities: assistance to students with examination of gross pathology specimens and associated microscopic slides
  • Caruso C – Internal Medicine Core Curriculum Series, Responsibilities: noon conference “Blood Bank basics for Internal Medicine residents”, Duration: 2 hrs.
  • Kessler M – Career Technology Academy, 3/2014
  • Kessler M – Gastrointestinal Gross Lab Facilitator, 12/2013
  • Kessler M – Renal Gross Lab Facilitator, 10/2013
  • Kessler M – Cardiovascular Gross Lab Facilitator, 9/2013
  • Lokhandwala P – Pathology Laboratory Facilitator, Renal Laboratory
  • Newell J – Pathology Laboratory instructor: Reproductive System, 2nd year
  • Newell J – Lecturer (2), Reproductive System Organ Block (REPRO), 2nd year
  • Newell J – Lecturer, Scientific Principles of Medicine (SPM 1012-1014), 1st year
  • Newell J – Review Leader, Scientific Principles of Medicine Review (SPM 1012-1014), 1st year
  • Newell J – Host, Pathology Observership, 1st year
  • Newell J – Mentor/Instructor: Senior Medical Student Elective – surgical pathology, cytopathology, and autopsy pathology, 3rd/4th year
  • Newell J – Pathology residency program representative for medical student career fair
  • Voss S – Mentor/Instructor: Senior Medical Student Elective – surgical pathology, cytopathology, and autopsy pathology, 3rd/4th year
  • Weyant G – Mentor/Instructor: Senior Medical Student Elective – surgical pathology, cytopathology, and autopsy pathology, 3rd/4th year
  • Weyant G – Laboratory instructor: Cardiovascular Pathology Laboratory (CAR 722), 2nd year
  • Weyant G – Laboratory instructor: GI Pathology Laboratory (GI 729), 2nd year
  • Weyant G – Pathology residency program representative for medical student career fair
  • Wilkinson L – Mentor/Instructor: Senior Medical Student Elective – surgical pathology, cytopathology, and autopsy pathology, 3rd/4th year

Medical Student Teaching Activities, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

  • Erdman P, Kessler M, Mikesell K, George M.  Question and Answer Session, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Med (PCOM) Pathology Interest Group, Conference Call, 10/2013

High School Student Teaching Activities

  • Newell, J – “Pathology Show and Tell,” Hershey High School, AP environmental and AP Biology students, 12/19/2013
  • Kessler, M – Penn State College of Medicine Career Technology Academy, 3/2014
  • Erdman, P – “What is Pathology?” PA Youth Apprenticeship Program, Hershey, PA, 4/2014
  • Newell, J – Presenter, PYAP/Capstone Programs, 4/2014
  • Wilkinson, L – “What is Pathology?” PA Youth Apprenticeship Program, Hershey, PA, 4/2014
  • Wilkinson, L – “What is Pathology?” Harrisburg Science Technical High School student talk, Hershey, PA, 4/2014
  • Wilkinson, L – Laboratory coordinator/facilitator, Med Camp – Cancer Pathology Workshop, Hershey, PA, 6/2014

Pathology Residency Program Teaching

Pathology Resident Core Curriculum Lectures 2013-2014

  • Lynch, MC – “Melanocytic Lesions,” Resident Core Lecture Series, Hershey, PA, 8/2013
  • Wilkinson, LA – “Review of Soft Tissue Tumors,” Resident Core Lecture Series, Hershey, PA, 8/2013
  • Weyant, GW – “Approaches to Inflammatory Dermatoses,” Resident Core Lecture Series, Hershey, PA, 8/2013
  • Nie, X – “Hematopoeisis and Benign Bone Marrow,” Resident Core Lecture Series, Hershey, PA, 12/11/2013
  • Nie, X – “Hematopathology Board Review,” Resident Core Lecture Series, Hershey, PA, 12/22/2013
  • Olson, JE – “Antibody ID Basics in Blood Banking,” Resident Core Lecture Series, Hershey, PA, 3/5/2013
  • Kessler, MS – “Forensic Pathology RISE Review Lecture,” Resident Core Lecture Series, Hershey, PA, 3/12/2013
  • Voss, SM – “Microbiology Review Jeopardy,” Resident Core Lecture Series, Hershey, PA, 3/17/2013
  • Lokhandwala, PM – “Platelet refractoriness,” Resident Core Lecture Series, Hershey, PA, 04/2014
  • Newell, JM – “Survival tips for Pathology Residency Training,” Resident Core Lecture Series, Hershey, PA, 06/2014

Orientation Lecture Series Presentations July 2013

  •     Caldwell, TR – Normal Histology of the Tubular Gastrointestinal (GI) system
  •     Kessler, MS – Normal Histology of the Lung and Heart
  •     Lokhandwala, PM – Basic CNS Histology
  •     Lynch MC – Normal Histology of the Skin
  •     Newell, JM – Normal Histology of the Prostate and Bladder
  •     Ohanessian, SE – Normal Histology of the Breast and Placenta
  •     Olson, JE – Introduction to Clinical Pathology
  •     Riley, MP – Introduction to the Hematopoietic System
  •     Voss, SM – Normal Histology of the Kidney and Liver
  •     Weyant, GW – Normal Histology of Connective Tissues
  •     Wilkinson, LA – Basic Gynecological Histology
  •     Yang, X – Normal Histology of Endocrine Organs

Themed Surgical Pathology Unknown Conference, 2013-2014

  • Navarro-Alvarez P – Head & Neck Resident Unknown Conference Series, Hershey, PA, 7/23/2013
  • Lynch MC– Adnexal Neoplasms Resident Unknown Conference Series, Hershey, PA, 1/21/2014
  • Wilkinson LA – Placental Pathology Resident Unknown Conference Series, 2/2/2014
  • Smith-Chakmakova F – Gynecological Pathology Resident Unknown Conference Series, 2/11/2014
  • Newell JM – Genitourinary Pathology Resident Unknown Conference Series, 2/25/2014
  • Wilkinson LA – Placental Pathology Resident Unknown Conference Series, Hershey, PA, 3/2014
  • Voss SM – Liver Pathology Resident Unknown Conference Series, Hershey, PA, 6/11/2013
  • Yang X – Gastrointestinal Pathology Resident Unknown Conference Series, 6/3/2014
  • Caldwell TR – ENT Resident Unknown Conference Series, Hershey, PA, 6/10/2014

Conference Leadership 2013-2014

  • Newell J – Conference Leader, Gynecologic Pathology Tumor Board, meets twice/month
  • Wilkinson L – Conference Leader, Musculoskeletal Tumor Board, meets twice/month
  • Voss SM – Conference Leaders, Interdisciplinary Pulmonary Conference, meets once/month
  • Mikesell KV – Coordinator, Blood Bank Journal Club, meets weekly
  • Nie, X – Coordinator, Hematopathology Didactic Lecture Series

To Apply

Application and supporting materials for the Pathology Residency must be submitted via ERAS (Electronic Residency Application Service). Applications sent directly to us by regular or electronic mail will not be accepted or considered.

Required items that should be sent to ERAS include:

  • Copy of your dean’s letter
  • Transcript
  • Official USMLE Step 1 scores
  • Three letters of recommendation

USMLE Step 2 must be taken, passed and scores received by February of the program entrance year. Step 3 scores are not necessary, but are helpful.

International medical graduates are also required to have ECFMG certification and have a currently valid ECFMG certificate to present upon employment. We sponsor J-1 visas only.

We evaluate the candidate’s entire application package during the review process. We do not have defined minimum USMLE scores, grade-point averages, or year of graduation from medical school; however, it is important that an applicant shows evidence of continual learning during any period of absence from the field of pathology and medicine. Work experience in a U.S. clinical laboratory is not required. We do not allow observerships in any department within our hospital.

Application Timetable

ERAS deadline is Dec. 1 of the year before desired program start date. Interviews are generally conducted on a rolling basis between October and January, and selected applicants will be contacted by email to set up interview dates. Match Day takes place in March.

Research Opportunities

The Department of Pathology is committed to research, and encourages residents to participate in research projects. Applications from physician-scientists are welcomed. The department will work with candidates interested in combining clinical and research training to plan a program that both meets the requirements of the American Board of Pathology and integrates structured research training, which may include up to six months of research time during residency. A select group of applicants may qualify for a guaranteed additional year of support to pursue their research interests.

Candidates interested in these opportunities are encouraged to contact Program Director Melissa George, DO, at (mgeorge5@pennstatehealth.psu.edu), in addition to submitting the ERAS application.

Faculty

Pathology Residency participants at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center are seen in a group photo in the courtyard in 2017, along with departmental fellows and program leadership. The group of residents are all wearing white medical coats and sitting or standing in three rows.

Current Residents

Past Residents

See where our soon-to-graduate and recently graduated residents pursue fellowship and employment.

Contact Us

Mailing Address

Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
Penn State College of Medicine
Department of Pathology
MC H083
500 University Dr.
Hershey, PA 17033

General Contact Information

Email: PathologyResidencyProgram@pennstatehealth.psu.edu

Phone717-531-8247

Penn State College of Medicine is an equal-opportunity employer and accepts all qualified applications regardless of their gender, ethnic origin or religious background.